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HISTORY & INFORMATION

 History of the Plott Hound

Of the six breeds of U.K.C. registered Coonhounds, only the Plott Hound doesn't trace it's ancestry to the foxhound; and of the breeds, we can be most certain of the Plott's heritage and the men most responsible for it's development.

The ancestors of today's Plott were used for boar hunting in Germany many years ago.
Johannes George Plott left his native Germany and came to this country in 1750. He brought a few wild boar hounds with him. These dogs had been bred for generations for their stamina and gameness. Plott and his family settled in the mountains of  western North Carolina.

In those days there were no wild boar in this country. Johannes used his dogs for hunting bears. He supposedly kept his strain entirely pure, making no outcrosses. Around 1800, the Plott pack passed into the hands of his son, Henry Plott.

Shortly after that time a hunter living in Georgia who had been breeding his own outstanding strain of "leopard spotted bear dogs" heard of the fame of the Plott Hounds and came to North Carolina to see for himself. He was so impressed that he borrowed one of Plott's top stud dogs for a year to breed to his own bitches. This single cross is the only known instance of new blood being introduced into the Plott Hound since they first came to this country.

Other crosses possibly took place around the year 1900. G.P. Ferguson, who was a neighbor of the Plott family in North Carolina in those days, was a major influence on the Plott breed. He made a careful study of the Blevins hounds and the Cable hounds of that era. To what extent he used these bloodlines in his Plott breeding program, is not known.

The Plott Hound was first registered with United Kennel Club in 1946. Today's Plotts are known for their great courage and stamina. They have a clear voice that carries well.




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